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Bedrock Lectures: Winona LaDuke

The Next Energy Economy: Grassroots Strategies to Mitigate Global Climate Change, and How We Move Ahead

Wednesday, May 2, 2018 10:00 AM

In the months leading up to the Permanent Peoples’ Tribunal on Human Rights, Fracking and Climate Change, Spring Creek Project presents the Bedrock Lectures on Human Rights and Climate Change.

This online series features leading scientists, attorneys, writers, community leaders, activists, and artists. Together, the lectures create a chorus of voices and ideas that will invite audiences to imagine how we can build communities and lives in a world where environmental crises quickly become human rights crises.

We will release a new Bedrock Lecture every Wednesday from January 31 to May 30, 2018. The lectures are free and publically available on our website and social media channels. We also encourage you to come to the in-person screening of the lectures at noon each Wednesday in Bexell Hall 412. Each lecture will be about 20 minutes, and we invite you to watch them from your desk, with a group of friends, or at a community gathering.

 

Winona LaDuke,  Executive Director of Honor the Earth, will share her lecture, "The Next Energy Economy: Grassroots Strategies to Mitigate Global Climate Change, and How We Move Ahead," on May 2, 2018. 

Winona LaDuke is an internationally renowned activist working on issues of sustainable development, renewable energy and food systems. She lives and works on the White Earth reservation in northern Minnesota, and is a two-time vice presidential candidate with Ralph Nader for the Green Party.

As program Director of the Honor the Earth, she works nationally and internationally on the issues of climate change, renewable energy, and environmental justice with Indigenous communities. And in her own community, she is the founder of the White Earth Land Recovery Project, one of the largest reservation-based, non-profit organizations in the country, and a leader in the issues of culturally-based sustainable development strategies, renewable energy and food systems. In this work, she also continues national and international work to protect Indigenous plants and heritage foods from patenting and genetic engineering.


Bexell Hall (campus map)
412
Emily Grubby
grubbye at oregonstate.edu
Environmental Arts & Humanitie