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Silencing the Past: On Imperious Historical Categories


Monday, February 11, 2013 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

This Jorge Canizared-Esguerratalk will look past the blinders that historiographical categories such as The Enlightenment, the Scientific Revolution, Puritanism, the Reformation, and the Renaissance have imposed on scholarship.

Day in and day out, these categories churn out endless, condescending, patronizing narratives of the global south.  

They have marginalized entire territories and rendered invisible the richness, complexity, and intellectual vibrancy of Hispanic societies.

Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra is the Alice Drysdale Sheffield Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin. Cañizares-Esguerra got his PhD at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.  Before UT, he taught at Illinois State University and SUNNY-Buffalo. He has also been a visiting professor in several universities outside the United States, including the Universidade Federal do Ouro Preto (Mariana- Brazil); the Universidade Etaduale de Campinas (Campinas-Brazil), the Universidad de los Andes (Bogotá-Colombia); the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana (Bogota-Colombia); the FLACSO (Quito-Ecuador).

Cañizares-Esguerra has won numerous national fellowships given by the Social Science Research Council, the National Endowment of the Humanities (at the John Carter Brown Library), the Andrew Mellon (at the Huntington Library), the Charles Warren Center of Studies of American History (at Harvard); the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton; and the Donald D. Harrington Fellows Program (at the University of Texas). In 2010 Canizares-Esguerra was the Andrew Mellon Senior Fellow of the John Carter Brown Library.

Cañizares-Esguerra has received numerous prizes, including the 1999-2001 best article award from the Forum in the History of the Human Sciences of the History of Science Society; the 2001 AHA prize on Atlantic History; the 2001 AHA prize in Latin American and Spanish History; and the 2006-2007 biannual Honorable Mention of the Murdo MacLeod Book Prize of The Latin American and Caribbean Section of the Southern Historical Association. His How to Write the History of the New World was cited among the best books of the year (2001) by The Economist. It also made into the “best book of the year” lists of  TLS and the Independent (London).

 


LaSells Stewart Center (campus map)
C&E Auditorium
Corvallis
OR
Free
Robert Peckyno
541-737-8560
robert.peckyno at oregonstate.edu
School of History, Philosophy, and Religion